Coinage of Jafleaye

History

Jafleaye’s economy is based very heavily on trade and commerce and, as a result, coins are ubiquitous in this country as compared to the other nations of Talaura. Upon its foundation three-hundred years ago by the twelve wealthy individuals, the majority of trade was conducted using formal agreements, written on paper, signed by both parties and stamped or sealed by a neutral third-party. While this method was adequate for a small group conducting trade on a macro level, when the country’s population began to boom and trade was conducted on a much finer scale between large groups, a better solution was needed.
Coins had been used for a long time in Skoiasu and Shabar, where they were typically fashioned from two-inch squares of black slate (a material whose name in the Shabar language has become synonymous with “currency” or “cash”) but their value was never fixed against specific commodities. Instead, trade would happen between two individuals with the coins representing something roughly equivalent in the near future.
Tesman was the first country to use metal coins, though they were typically only used in high-value transactions. Coins were referred to as “Tithe Bronze” and each one was a 1oz disc of bronze punched out from a larger 10oz bar. Each piece of Tithe Bronze represented ownership of the bar it came from, but as a result, this was only really a viable form of exchange between artisans and craftsmen dealing in copper. Because of Tesman’s high Centaur population, a lot of ownership of goods and land was seen as communal, meaning each family or clan would not have to trade within itself and would only have to trade with other clans. As a result, Tithe Bronze was only a popular method of trade between business owners and entrepreneurs, while those at the lower end of the economic spectrum were more self-sufficient. However, with international trade expanding in recent years, more members of the Tesman community are becoming open to the idea of trading for fiat value, typically favouring Centrico-minted coins over local Tithe Bronze, which remains a symbol of the Tesman elite.

Minting

Though they are still referred to as “Gold”, “Silver” and “Bronze” pieces, Jafleaye’s currency (collectively referred to as “Mangir”) has not been constructed from those metals for years, as the value of the precious metals in them soon began to outweigh their face value. Instead, Gold and Silver pieces are usually constructed of a heavier, baser metal such as tin or zinc and only plated with gold or silver. Bronze pieces were once made out of bronze but soon started to be struck from copper or brass, or some similarly-coloured but less valuable metal.

Coins and denominations

Jafleaye’s currency is composed of three main subdivisions: the “Servet” or “Gold Piece”, the largest denomination is equivalent to twenty “Para” or “Silver Pieces”. Each “Para” is further divided into twelve “Tunc”, or “Bronze Pieces”.

The main pieces for trade are:

  • The Servet: a gold coin worth one Servet, featuring a stylised image of The Sphinx Lucrezia on the obverse and the coat of arms of Centrico on the reverse. Servets are exclusively minted in Centrico and are typically one-inch in diameter.
  • The Cift-Servet: a gold coin worth two Servets, features a stylised image of the Sphinx Lucrezia on the obverse and the coat of arms of Centrico on the reverse. These coins are appreciably larger than Servet coins and are heptagonal rather than circular. These coins have fallen out of popularity in recent years due to their value being unnecessarily high for day-to-day life.
  • The Ceyrek: a silver coin worth five Para, or one-quarter of a Servet. This coin features a stylised image of the Sphinx Lucrezia on the obverse and a seven-petalled flower on the reverse, and is typically three-quarters of an inch in diameter.
  • The Garip: a silver coin worth four Para and one Tunc, featuring a stylised image of the Sphinx Lucrezia on the obverse and an image of a sailing ship on the reverse. This coin is slightly, but appreciably, smaller than the Ceyrek and is particularly favoured by merchants and shoppers alike for its versatility and usefulness.
  • The Cift: a silver coin worth two Para, featuring a stylised image of the Sphinx Lucrezia on the obverse and an upturned crescent moon on the reverse. These coins are just under one half of an inch in diameter.
  • The Para: a silver coin worth one Para, featuring the coat of arms of Centrico on the obverse and a laurel wreath on the reverse. These are one of the most popular coins, and are only marginally smaller than the Cift.
  • The Yarim: a bronze coin worth six Tunc, featuring an image of Lucrezia on the obverse and the coat of arms of Centrico on the reverse. These coins are remarkably large, about three-quarters of an inch in diameter and are not popular because of their cumbersome weight.
  • The Triyo: a bronze coin worth three Tunc, featuring an image of Lucrezia on the obverse and a laurel wreath on the reverse. These coins are roughly half an inch in diameter.
  • The Cift-Tek: a bronze coin worth two Tunc, featuring an image of Lucrezia on both faces. The obverse also bears the value of the coin in numeral. These coins are three-eighths of an inch in diameter (halfway in size between a Triyo and a Tunc.
  • The Tunc: a bronze coin worth one Tunc. These coins are so common and disposable that people rarely pay them any attention, and they can often be found thrown away in the streets. These coins are tiny, under one quarter of an inch, and feature an image of Lucrezia on both faces.

Coinage of Jafleaye

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